Guest Column

There are many theories, opinions and practices when it comes to arts, culture and heritage. We encourage guests to share their views with us.

The artist in her own words

Working on Quotidian life: the importance of small things “has helped me realise that my creativity as a photographer does not come from ideas in my mind alone. They are fuelled by the conviction in my heart that we are all in this together.”

Read more...

Old pictures tell enduring rural truths

The Cold Choice: Operation Hunger: A photography exhibition at Iziko Slave Lodge by Struan Robertson focusing on the plight of rural people during apartheid.

Read more...

On remembering Hector Pieterson

Resistance, atrocity, commodification, leisure: Ali Khangela Hlongwane critiques the sculpture of Hector Pieterson, Antoinette Sithole and Mbuyisa Makhubu at Maponya Mall.

Read more...

Self, land and power: the art of Alan Crump

A gifted artist and teacher, Alan Crump was fearless in his vision for art. In his own bold work and in inspiring his students, he kept art moving, writes Karel Nel in the catalogue for the artist's retrospective.

Read more...

Tales of Vilakazi Street

The Vilakazi Street Oral History Exhibition is a small record of the day to day lives of ordinary Sowetans living on the famous street, using photographs and video recordings, says Sally Gaule.

Read more...

Fosatu History is a tale of worker power

Exploring the history of the Federation of South African Trade Unions gives rise to nonracial nostalgia, writes Professor Philip Bonner. There are also lessons for recreating a vigorous, substantial and healthy civil society.

Read more...

Wine unites a continent

At opposite ends of a continent, South Africa and Egypt are united by the sweet wine we know as Hanepoot, an ancient grape also called Muscat of Alexandria, writes Vanya Vucinic.

Read more...

The story of Museum Africa’s beginnings

Following his philosophy of three-dimensional thinking, all South Africans – and by extension their cultural artefacts – had equal merit. This made John Gubbins the polar opposite of apartheid, writes Sara Byala.

Read more...

Transforming communities through art

Working with three projects - Artist Proof Studio, Phumani Paper and the Paper Prayers HIV/Aids campaign – Kim Berman illustrates how the arts can be seen as a means of activism; for education and research; and for healing.

Read more...

Changing contexts at JAG

Labelled an "avant-garde" gallery by progressive London critics when it opened in 1910, since 1994, the Johannesburg Art Gallery has turned its compass towards South Africa. Jillian Carman introduces a centenary book that sets out to explain the complexities which make up JAG in 2010.

Read more...